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Maggie

Last weekend, I met a hero. Oh, I know, "hero" is a cliché of military history. I've always been skeptical of the term. How do you judge a hero? What is the qualification? Do you have to...
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Niwi: Nine Men

Last week, I wrote a teaser about the 1940 campaign. For most military historians, the German victory in France remains a kind of gold standard: a rapid, decisive, and relatively bloodless victory that smashed...
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Niwi: The Fog of War

Military historians love to emphasize the planning process. They like to talk about "perfect plans," showing how the genius of the great commander can manifest itself even before the shooting starts....
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Ugly: A Last Note on the Ethiopian Campaign

Over the last few weeks, I've been writing about the Italian campaign in Ethiopia (1935–36), one of the many wars between the two world wars. We often speak of the "interwar" period, but in...
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Sitting in Judgment: the Ethiopia Campaign

Last week I wrote about the Italian campaign in Ethiopia (or Abyssinia, as many in the world still called it) in 1935–36. It barely registers in the western historical consciousness today. After all,...
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One Tough Campaign

Last week I had some fun here, talking about a mighty warlord of the 1930s deciding to launch a war against a smaller and weaker adversary, and in the process precipitating World War II. Trying to be clever, I...
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United Nations: The Axis Allies

One of the toughest questions a historian of World War II has to answer is, "How did the Germans stay in the field so long?" Their plan to conquer the Soviet Union in a single quick campaign in 1941...
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Trains.

The lifeline of the Wehrmacht’s multiple-front war was the European rail network, the same system that supported the killing of Jews during the Holocaust.
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Going Heavy: the sIG 33

I’m a lucky guy. I have a thousand friends. Many are scholars, and they are interesting, educated, and globe-trotting. A lot of them take advantage of the summer to do their research, and they all make...