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Aviation History

Authoritative, in-depth history of world aviation from its origins to the Space Age. Aviation History offers air enthusiasts the most detailed coverage of the history of manned flight, with action-packed stories and illustrations that put the reader in the cockpit to experience aviation’s greatest dramas.




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Letters from Readers- July 2008

    Seiran Engine Surfaces I was delighted to see the article in your May issue about the Japanese subs that carried Aichi M6A1 Seiran floatplanes (“Japan’s Panama Canal Buster,” by John Geoghegan). A few years ago, my organization...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    WarBirds 2008

    The classic online sim still delivers after a decade. Even though WarBirds is more than 10 years old, this dedicated online flight sim still enjoys a committed following. Updated nearly nonstop since its debut, it continues to gain new...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Wind, Sand and Stars

    Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Among the many honors accorded Antoine de Saint-Exupéry—“Saint-Ex,” as he is often called—comes a memorable one from National Geographic, which listed Wind, Sand and Stars as one...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Review: Attack on Yamamoto

    Attack on Yamamoto: The Daring Mission to Shoot Down Japan’s Pacific Fleet Commander Pacific Vista Publishing Co., Newberg, Ore., $24.95. It was one of the boldest missions of World War II, reminiscent of the surprise attack on Japan led...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: X-15

    X-15: Extending the Frontiers of Flight by Dennis R. Jenkins, NASA, available for free download, 2007. It is usually unwise to call a book “definitive” because you never know what is waiting at the publishers, but I can say...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: U.S. Naval Air Superiority

    U.S. Naval Air Superiority: Development of Shipborne Jet Fighters 1943-1962 by Tommy H. Thomason, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2007, $44.95. Far-reaching, well organized and wonderfully detailed is the way I would describe Tommy...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Date With Doolittle

    Its mission accomplished, a B-25 heads west to safer skies. For his fourth painting in a series depicting the famous Doolittle Raiders, artist William Phillips chose to show a solitary North American B-25B after it had completed its...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Greatest Balloon Buster

    Willy Coppens specialized in the most dangerous occupation of a World War I airman—flaming kite balloons deep behind enemy lines. First used by the Revolutionary French army in 1795, captive or kite balloons, also known as Drachen...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Arado 234: Archetype of Jet-Powered Bombers

    No one at the Westphalia airfield outside Munster on July 30, 1943, knew just how important the flight they witnessed would be to the future of military aviation. That day marked the beginning of a cascade of events that would lead to the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Kamikaze Kismet

    Armed with a half ton of explosives, the crew of an antiquated Val diver bomber set out to crash into a U.S. ship of Okinawa. But fate—in the form of three attacking Corsairs—soon intervened.  Kazuo Nakajima still remembers the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Road Not Taken

    Although many designers have tried to build a practical flying car, the idea never took off. Traffic is one of the banes of modern existence. What road- weary commuter has not dreamed of being able to simply fly over gridlocked traffic to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    A minor noble and a major writer, Frenchman Antoine de Saint-Exupéry packed more varied, far-flung flying into his meteoric 44 years than any of his contemporaries except Lindbergh. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry was a writer who flew, not a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Letter from the Editor- September 2008

    Aviation Ambassador At a time when the aviation industry as a whole, and the airline industry in particular, is getting a bum rap, 23-year-old Jamail Larkins is a breath of fresh air. Larkins has been traveling the country for four years...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bonney Gull

    Leonard Bonney reverted to man’s oldest intuitive flight design. It used to be that there were weights and balances in relating history. Major events drew more attention, while lesser ones passed into oblivion. No more— YouTube has...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Champaign Lady

    The restoration of a rare B-17G test-bed is a family affair. At first glance the hangar at Grimes Field outside Urbana, Ohio, seems like a typical repair facility, but inside it’s reminiscent of a World War II aircraft factory. And just...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Symphony of Flight

    Octave Chanute conducted from behind the scenes. The letter, dated May 13, 1900, was astonishing in its directness, lacking even the customary salutation. “For some years,” it began, “I have been afflicted with the belief that flight...