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Aviation History

Authoritative, in-depth history of world aviation from its origins to the Space Age. Aviation History offers air enthusiasts the most detailed coverage of the history of manned flight, with action-packed stories and illustrations that put the reader in the cockpit to experience aviation’s greatest dramas.




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Red Baron

    Red Baron: The Life and Death of an Ace by Peter Kilduff, David & Charles Ltd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 2007, $30. As the highest-scoring fighter pilot of World War I, Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen, more widely known as the Red Baron, has...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Pan American Clippers

    Pan American Clippers: The Golden Age of Flying Boats by James Trautman, Boston Mills Press, 2007, $49.95. The story of Pan American Airways and the magnificent flying boats that marked the beginning of international air travel has been...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Rupert Red Two

    Rupert Red Two: A Fighter Pilot’s Life From Thunderbolts to Thunderchiefs by Jack Broughton, Zenith Press, St. Paul, Minn., 2008, $26.95. There are two words on the cover of this book that should make anyone—aviation enthusiast or...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Reviews: Burma Air Campaign and Flying Tigers

    Flying Tigers: Claire Chennault and his American Volunteers, 1941-1942 by Daniel Ford, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C., 2007, $15.95. The Burma Air Campaign, 1941-1945 by Michael Pearson, Pen & Sword Books Ltd.,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Boulevards of Paris

    A running dogfight raged over the city’s rooftops in July 1944. Tommy Hayes was one of the most capable fighter squadron leaders of the U.S. Eighth Air Force. When I talked with him in 1998, I asked if there was any World War II mission...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Unfettered Turkeys

    It’s easy enough to design a bad airplane, but it takes real gumption to put it into production despite all signs to the contrary. There are many reasons why less than first-rate aircraft are produced in quantity. The most dominant...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Flying Cowboy: Frederick Libby

    Frederick Libby became America’s first ace while flying as an observer-gunner in a spindly British pusher-propelled biplane. The apprentice airman could scarcely believe his situation. Yesterday he had been a supply truck driver with the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Red Horde Over Russia

    Built in vast numbers, Aleksandr Yakovlev’s fighters were among the most important Allied aircraft of World War II. Yakovlev aircraft have become as closely associated with World War II Soviet air power as Messerschmitts are with the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Flying Tiger Burning Bright

    During a meteoric combat career, ‘Scarsdale Jack’ Newkirk blazed the way for his fellow Panda Bear pilots. “For a period of more than three months after Pearl Harbor the American Volunteer Group was the pet and darling of the United...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Letter from the Editor- July 2008

    A Life in Aviation The fresh-faced young man—kid, really—smiles as he poses for a photo in front of his shark-mouthed Curtiss P-40N Warhawk in China. Don Lopez was only 19 when he shipped out to join the 75th Fighter Squadron of the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Fokker’s Fünfdecker

    With the V8, Anthony Fokker pursued a questionable concept into extreme territory. “Fokker is still the old Fokker,” wrote Lieutenant Rudolf Stark after seeing Fokker D.VII and E.V fighters on August 24, 1918, “for every new machine...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Polish Fighter’s Odyssey

    Formerly a Nazi war trophy, a rare PZL P.11c is now the crown jewel in Krakow’s Polish Aviation Museum. When Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, one of its key objectives was to annihilate the Polish air force. One reason the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Baroness of Flight

    Raymonde de Laroche’s first flight with Wilbur Wright sparked a fatal attraction to flying. When Wilbur Wright went to France in 1908 to demonstrate the Flyer to skeptical French officials, he followed his dazzling aerial displays near...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- July 2008

    The Oldest Herk The U.S. Marines traditionally get the short end of the stick when it comes to aircraft. Their planes are often old and outmoded, or variants that the Navy isn’t quite sure what to do with. So it should come as no...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Letters from Readers- July 2008

    Seiran Engine Surfaces I was delighted to see the article in your May issue about the Japanese subs that carried Aichi M6A1 Seiran floatplanes (“Japan’s Panama Canal Buster,” by John Geoghegan). A few years ago, my organization...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    WarBirds 2008

    The classic online sim still delivers after a decade. Even though WarBirds is more than 10 years old, this dedicated online flight sim still enjoys a committed following. Updated nearly nonstop since its debut, it continues to gain new...