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Aviation History

Authoritative, in-depth history of world aviation from its origins to the Space Age. Aviation History offers air enthusiasts the most detailed coverage of the history of manned flight, with action-packed stories and illustrations that put the reader in the cockpit to experience aviation’s greatest dramas.




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Review: Battlestations Midway

    Naval Warfare With Killer Graphics. The new WWII naval warfare game Battlestations Midway ($40, requires Microsoft 8Ghz processor, 512MB RAM, 6GB hard drive space, 64MB video card, DVD-ROM drive, Internet connection required for...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Aviation Century- War & Peace in the Air

    Aviation Century: War & Peace in the Air by Ron Dick and Dan Patterson, Boston Mills Press, Ontario, Canada, 2006, $49.95. This, the fifth and last volume in an extraordinary series, measures up in every way to its four predecessors...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Review: Silent Wings

    Silent Wings: The American Glider Pilots of WWII DVD, narrated by Hal Holbrook, 2007, $24.95. Hard though it may be to believe that there is any specialized field within the U.S. military whose contribution to victory in World War II has...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Finding Amelia

    Finding Amelia: The True Story of the Earhart Disappearance by Ric Gillespie, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., 2006, $28.95. Ric Gillespie has been the most dogged investigator among more than three dozen writers, several of them...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Concorde

    Concorde by Frederic Beniada and Michel Fraile, Zenith Press, St. Paul, Minn., 2006, $60. The name Concorde immediately conjures up mental images of the sleek, arrowlike Air France–British Airways supersonic transport that represented...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: LeMay

    LeMay (Palgrave-Macmillan, New York, 2007, $21.95) One day in the 1980S, former U.S. Air Force radar specialist Sam Korth met retired General Curtis E. LeMay at an airshow and asked him if a popular story about him was true. Had the World...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Pou du Ciel

    History’s first homebuilt entrepreneur named his aircraft after an insect. By the mid-1920s aviation was no longer solely the province of the professional. The man (and woman) on the street desperately wanted to get in on it....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Flights of Fancy

    Air war pulp magazines introduced a generation of action-hungry Americans to drama on the wing. The Germans came in fast, stair-step, the Spandaus on their cowls yammering. The Yank’s face was taut, frozen; the Hisso snarled upward into...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Mustang Mission to Achmer

    Bob McCandless witnessed a double Me-262 kill before his P-51 was shot down in flames over enemy territory. Two yellow-nosed North American P-51 Mustangs started their dive from 15,000 feet and were doing 450 miles per hour when they...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Lindbergh Line

    Convinced the public was ready for air travel, “Lucky Lindy” launched an innovative air-and-rail service. At the tender age of 4, Gore Vidal flew on Transcontinental Air Transport’s inaugural cross-country flight in the summer of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Ace in a Day

    Major Archie G. Donahue shot down five aircraft on a single mission—twice. Major Archie Donahue’s reputation preceded him when he began training a new generation of U.S. Marine pilots to operate the Vought F4U-1D Corsair from aircraft...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Eyes of the Fleet

    David Quinlan pays tribute to his Pearl Harbor veteran father. Right before 0800 hours on December 7, 1941, Boatswains Mate John J. Quinlan had just finished putting on his uniform before attending Sunday Mass when he heard explosions and...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Last of the Tomahawks

    A patched-up P-40B soldiered on at Bataan. Both before and during World War II, the Curtiss-Wright Airplane Company manufactured three versions of its P-40. The first, the B-model, called the Tomahawk by the British who flew it in North...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    BQM-34A Firebee

    The Combat Air Museum’s restoration stands out after decades of obscurity. Dick Trupp passing by the plane many times as he and his wife traveled north from Topeka, Kansas, to visit relatives in Nebraska. Trupp, the wing commander of the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Larry Walters (“Lawnchair Larry”)

    July 2, 1982, San Pedro, Calif.— Larry Walters, a 33-year-old truck driver, lofted into the air in perhaps the most precarious way possible—in a Sears lawn chair. Lift was provided by 42 helium-filled weather balloons. Walters reached...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- July 2007

    The Day the Music Died If you’ve seen the film La Bamba or heard the Don McLean song “American  Pie” (“something touched me deep inside/the day the music died”), you know at least a little bit about the airplane accident...