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Aviation History

Authoritative, in-depth history of world aviation from its origins to the Space Age. Aviation History offers air enthusiasts the most detailed coverage of the history of manned flight, with action-packed stories and illustrations that put the reader in the cockpit to experience aviation’s greatest dramas.




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Blowup at the Covey Bomb Dump

    The fireworks didn’t let up for 10 days during the Vietnam War’s most successful aerial interdiction effort against the Ho Chi Minh Trail. In the pitch-black early morning hours of December 19, 1970, a U.S. Air Force forward air...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Eagle of Lille

    As a leader of Germany’s deadly “Fokker Scourge,” Max Immelmann almost single-handedly took on Britain’s Royal Flying Corps. It didn’t take long for Ensign Max Immelmann of the Imperial German Flying Corps, piloting unarmed two-...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Vanished!: What Happened to the Hawaii Clipper?

    In the 75 years since the Hawaii Clipper disappeared, no one has figured out what happened to the flying boat and its crew. A few minutes before 6 a.m. on July 29, 1938, Pan American Airways Captain Leonard Terletzky taxied the Clipper out...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Mitchell’s Masterpiece

    When the Spitfire entered squadron service 75 years ago, it was exactly the right airplane at the right time for Britain. But if not for the dedication of one man, it might never have been built The silver aircraft, displaying the familiar...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Soldier of a New Time

    American volunteer pilot Ben Leider was a mercenary in name only during the Spanish Civil War. Although the U.S. was nominally neutral in the Spanish Civil War—which pitted Spain’s Nationalists, aided by Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Stearman Is Reborn

    The Kansas Aviation Museum’s Stearman Model 4D will serve as a proud sentinel of its new Golden Age display. In 1998 the Kansas Aviation Museum (KAM) in Wichita acquired the welded- steel fuselage and three boxes of parts from a derelict...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Solar-Powered Odyssey

    “The more you fly, the more energy you have,” says André Borschberg. “In theory, the plane could fly forever.” For a brief time on July 6, in the night-time sky just south of New York City, pilot André Borschberg and his partner...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- November 2013

    Douglas World Cruiser Redux Any American who can fog a mirror will know the name of the airplane and aviator that first flew from New York to Paris nonstop, but the details of a perhaps more difficult accomplishment—first to fly all the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Natural: Marion Carl

    NATURAL-BORN AVIATORS ARE EXTREMELY RARE. Humans aren’t designed to operate in three dimensions, and learning to adapt to the vertical normally requires study, determination and practice. The innate ability to excel in flight is a gift...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Lindbergh’s Path to Glory

    Before he gained a worldwide reputation as “Lucky Lindy,” Charles A. Lindbergh developed a solid repertoire of aviation skills. When Charles A. Lindbergh set out on his solo transatlantic flight in May 1927, it signaled the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Iron Eagle’s Last Flight

    After Hans-Ulrich Rudel ended his combat career by purposely crash-landing on an American airfield, the defiant Nazi refused to surrender. Early on May 8, 1945, the most decorated German soldier of World War II, Colonel Hans-Ulrich Rudel,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: The Bishop’s Boys, by Tom Crouch

    The Bishop’s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright by Tom Crouch On the 110th anniversary of their immortal flights at Kitty Hawk, it seems appropriate to go back to stuff we might have missed the first—or second or third—time we...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: Convair PB4Y-2/ P4Y-2 Privateer

    Convair PB4Y-2/ P4Y-2 Privateer by Nicholas A. Veronico and Steve Ginter, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2012, $49.95  The Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer is one of those great warplanes we all know but would like to know more...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: Sopwith Camel, by Jon Guttman

    Sopwith Camel by Jon Guttman, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, UK, 2012, $18.95  One of the risks of being a geezer is remembering what it was like so many years ago, when aircraft books were published at the rate of perhaps 10 or 15 a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: Mustang, by Steve Pace

    Mustang: Thoroughbred Stallion of the Air by Steve Pace, Fonthill, Gloucester, UK, 2012, $39.95  Just when you think you know everything about the North American P-51, along comes Steve Pace’s fine new book, offering even more...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: SR-71, by Col. Richard H. Graham

    SR-71: The Complete Illustrated History of the Blackbird, the World’s Highest, Fastest Plane by Col. Richard H. Graham, USAF (Ret.), Zenith Press, Minneapolis, Minn., 2013, $35 Former SR-71 pilot Rich Graham has delivered a robust,...