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‘Wichita Fokker’ Takes Flight

The first production Travel Air, the Model 2000, was an American classic. It was the first successful replacement for the weary, worn-out, war-surplus Curtiss JN-4 Jennys that in the mid-1920s comprised the...
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Doolittle Raiders Drink a Final Toast

A milestone historical event took place on November 9, 2013, at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Rather than wait until there were only two Doolittle Tokyo Raiders left to turn over their own...
A Bristol Military Biplane replica, recently delivered to the Royal Australian Air Force, awaits testing. [James Kightly]

Down-Under Boxkite Replica

Until now, there has been only one flying Bristol Boxkite—the oft-photographed example that is part of the Shuttleworth Collection in England, a fragile chaos of cables and turnbuckles that is flown only...
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Learjet’s Golden Anniversary

It wasn’t until the age of 50 that Frank Sinatra owned his first Learjet, but for the next two years it would become perhaps the most notorious mode of transportation for Rat Pack members and their...

Dog Finds a New House

The Sikorsky UH-34D was properly named the Seahorse when flown by Marines, but jarheads usually called it the Dog. Nothing derogatory, for the Marines loved them—just a phonetic reference to its mark. This...
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Spanish Stork

For all its warlike mien and malevolent insignia, the Luftwaffe version of the Fieseler Fi-156 Storch (Stork) is somehow charming—all gawky gear legs, gaping overbite engine cowling, the cabin glazing...
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Morane-Saulnier Across the Med

It’s a quirk of history that Louis Blériot’s July 1909 crossing of the English Channel, a mere 22-mile hop, is much better known than a far more impressive flight that took place just over...
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Twin Beech Takes Top NAHI

Each year the National Aviation Heritage Invitational (NAHI) brings together some of America’s best aircraft restorations. The 15th NAHI competition was held September 11-15, 2013, at Stead Field in...
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From da Vinci to Voyager

"One can draw an imaginary line from the genius of the Renaissance , who dreamed about human flight by studying the flights of birds, to the research that led us to space, and gives us hopes to go to...
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Douglas World Cruiser Redux

Any American who can fog a mirror will know the name of the airplane and aviator that first flew from New York to Paris nonstop, but the details of a perhaps more difficult accomplishment—first to fly...
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A Tigercat Roars Again

The only reason to restore a Grumman F7F Tigercat is because it’s so beautiful. The airplane was rejected as a carrier-borne fighter, the role for which it was designed. Too fast and large for anything...
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Sikorsky Prize Goes to Canadians

After 33 years, the Igor I. Sikorsky Human Powered Helicopter Challenge has at last been met. The American Helicopter Society’s requirements were rigorous: The machine had to fly for at least 60...
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Germany Retires Its Last Phantom

On June 29 Germany became the latest—but by no means the last—country to retire its McDonnell-Douglas F-4F Phantom II fighter-bombers, after 41 years of service. Of the 263 Phantoms used by the...
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‘Flying Pencil’ Recovery

On August 26, 1940, German Dornier Do-17Zs of Kampfgeschwader 3 on a mission to bomb British airfields at Hornchurch and Debden were attacked by Boulton-Paul Defiants of No. 264 Squadron, Royal Air Force....
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Coast to Coast on Sun Power

Imagine flying 900 miles at about 40 mph in a cockpit that has half the interior space of a Mini Cooper, with wings the span of a commercial jet providing lift. Now remove the gas tank, add 12,000...
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New Drone Designs Take Wing

Even as debate continues over the ethical use of drones in foreign and domestic airspace, two new drone designs are nearing full airworthiness.