Aviation History Magazine Archives | Page 3 of 51 | HistoryNet MENU

Aviation History Magazine




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hall’s Aluminum Wonders

    Achieving maximum strength at minimum weight. During the Golden Age of flight, many new aviation firms sprang up. By far the greater percentage failed within their first few years. The reasons vary. In some instances, the whole company was...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Here Today, Gone Tomorrow

    The Airplane Division of Curtiss-Wright Corporation When World War II ended in August 1945, Curtiss-Wright Corporation could still claim the distinction of being the largest aircraft manufacturing company in the United States, having...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Airliner That Went to War

    But for the intervention of WWII, Curtiss-Wright’s big CW-20 might have displaced the Douglas DC-3 on many major air carrier routes. When First Lieutenant Edward D. Michalek, a former B-24 co-pilot, joined the Air Force Reserve in 1949,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Look Ahead at the U.S. Air Force

    The one constant in the U.S. Air Force’s 60-year history has been change, and the same will be true during the next 60 years. The U.S. Air Force got its butt kicked in Vietnam. We grievously underestimated the threat of surface-to-air...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Long Road to an Independent Air Force

    The creation of a separate American air arm settled a four-decade debate. It was a hot day at Washington’s National Airport on July 26, 1947, as President Harry S. Truman’s limousine drove up to Sacred Cow way to visit his mother, who...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Building a Supersonic Interceptor

    America’s first supersonic interceptor evolved from the most revolutionary development specs in U.S. Air Force history. Rather than procuring an airframe and its weapons as separate items, the 1950 proposal that spawned Convair’s F-102...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Reflections on the U.S. Air Force

    Three inspired leaders molded America’s Air Force in their own image—and changed it forever. In the first 60 years of its existence, the U.S. Air Force went from the hollow shell of its World War II demobilization status to become the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aircraft With Character

    An engineer-artist offers a unique perspective with his personality-infused illustrations. You’d be hard-pressed to find an aviation enthusiast who hasn’t seen some of Hank Caruso’s “Aerocatures.” They’ve appeared on calendars...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Shot Down Over Rabaul

    A Marine F4U-1 Corsair pilot, dodging enemy fire, paddled for his life. First Lieutenant Robert A. Schaeffer was among the luckiest Corsair pilots to both win and lose against Japanese Zeros over Rabaul and live to tell about it. In the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Lancer Takes the Stage

    Strategic Air & Space Museum refurbishes a B-1A strategic bomber. In July 2003, Nebraska’s Strategic Air & Space Museum received the first of 17 truckloads containing a mammoth reconstruction project: a North American Rockwell...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Skyblazers

    October 1949, Gütersloh, West Germany—The U.S. Air Forces Europe (USAFE) flight demonstration team, the Skyblazers, held its first public demonstration at a Royal Air Force base in occupied Germany. The team’s close-in aerobatics...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- September 2007

    One of Our Airliners Is Missing If somebody said a four- engine airliner had disappeared with everybody aboard, you’d be surprised. If they added that it had disappeared in the populous U.S. Midwest and was seen by numerous eyewitnesses...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Build an Me-163 Komet

    The 1/72nd-scale Messerschmitt Me-163 Komet rocket-powered interceptor from Hobby Boss (#80238) is ideal for a newcomer to modeling, or for a parent or grandparent who wants to teach youngsters plastic modeling techniques. It retails for...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Building “Dirty Dora”

    The C and D versions of North American Aviation’s B-25 bomber were probably the most modified of all the glass-nosed Mitchells flown during World War II. Generally, the aircraft left the factories as basic B-25s and were modified at the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Mystery Ship: November 2018

    Can you identify this turboprop target tug? Click here for the answer!  ...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Adolf Galland: The Luftwaffe’s Fighter General

    Legendary German fighter ace Adolf Galland fought Allied pilots in the air and inept Nazi leaders on the ground. With his slicked-back black hair and matching mustache, broken nose and perennial cigar, Lieutenant General Adolf Galland was...