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Mag: Aviation History Hero




  • Aviation History Magazine

    First Planes Down at Pearl

    Three National Guardsmen on a morning sightseeing flight were among the first casualties on December 7, 1941. ...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Pacific Tramps

    The story of the B-17s that arrived over Hawaii during the Japanese attack has been told many times, but what happened to them?    On December 7, 1941, 12 unarmed B-17s on their way to reinforce the Philippines arrived over Oahu...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Wildcat Warrior

    Marine Corps ace of aces Joe Foss wreaked havoc on the Japanese over Guadalcanal, becoming the first to equal Eddie Rickenbacker’s American World War I victory record. After unopposed landings early on August 7, 1942, the invasion of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Mother Ships

    In an effort to extend the range and altitude of smaller aircraft, mother ships have been employed for a variety of missions—some successful, others disastrous. Mother ships—aircraft designed to carry and launch small airplanes...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Boeing Century

    During its 100-year history, William Boeing’s company has developed many of the most iconic airplanes ever to take to the sky. The world’s largest aerospace company grew from a single simple, angular, twin-float seaplane: the 1916...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Andrews Celebrates U.S. Air Force 70th

    After a year off due to budget restrictions, the Joint Base Andrews Air Show was held at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washing­ton, D.C., on September 16-17, 2017. Spec­tators at the free airshow were treated to military aircraft...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Controversial Crash of K-14

    Was the loss of a patrol blimp off Maine in 1944 the result of pilot error, as the U.S. Navy maintains to this day, or was it due to a battle with a German U-boat?   When the U.S. Navy blimp K-14 went down in the Gulf of Maine in July...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Voice of Experience

    There were higher-scoring fighter aces and other hotshot test pilots, but nobody did both quite like Chuck Yeager. Few, if any, individuals are as well-known in the annals of aviation history as Charles E. “Chuck” Yeager. An...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Bat Out of Hell

    The rocket-powered Me-163 Komet interceptor outperformed every other World War II combat aircraft…if its pilots lived to fight. In late July 1944, P-51 Mustang pilots who thought they flew the best fighter aircraft over Germany received...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Last Flight of Hobo 28

    In one of America’s worst “Broken Arrow” incidents, a B-52 carrying four hydrogen bombs crashed on the ice off Greenland.  Major Alfred D’Amario thought the worst was over after his violent ejection from the dark and smoky...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Nonstop to Hawaii By Air and Sea

    When Commander John Rodgers’ PN-9 ran low on fuel 400 miles short of his destination, like a good Navy man he rigged the flying boat and sailed the rest of the way. Two years before Charles Lindbergh made his epic solo flight across the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Bud Anderson

    Triple fighter ace and test pilot Bud Anderson is a legend in his own time. Like millions of other Depression-era kids who became enthralled with flight during aviation’s golden era, Clarence E. “Bud” Anderson Jr. grew up crazy about...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Yankee Doodle Goes to Town

    The first American B-17 raid on occupied Europe 75 years ago gave U.S. commanders the confidence to ramp up their daylight bombing campaign. Early in the afternoon on August 17, 1942, the Wright Cyclone engines of a dozen Boeing B-17E...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Real ‘Bridges at Toko-Ri’

    James Michener’s bestseller and movie adaptation were based on one very bad day in North Korea It was a new kind of war.  In less than a decade the United States had sided with former enemies, retired its most famous general...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    ‘Lady Lindy’: The Remarkable Life of Amelia Earhart

    A tomboy who defied early-20th-century conventions, Earhart successfully crusaded for women pilots’ place in the sky. They called Amelia Earhart “Lady Lindy” after her first flight across the Atlantic. She was tall...

  • HistoryNet, Mag: Aviation History Aircraft, Mag: Aviation History Hero

    The Timeless Boeing 75

    More than eight decades after its introduction, the classic Stearman continues to thrill pilots looking for open-cockpit adventure. The Boeing Model 75 “Stearman” was the most prolific primary training aircraft of World War II and the...