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Mag: Aviation History Hero




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Pacific Tramps

    The story of the B-17s that arrived over Hawaii during the Japanese attack has been told many times, but what happened to them?    On December 7, 1941, 12 unarmed B-17s on their way to reinforce the Philippines arrived over Oahu...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Boeing B-52: Stratosaurus

    First flown in 1952, the venerable Boeing B-52 could well be the first military aircraft to remain in service for a century. Were it not for a 32-year-old U.S. Air Force colonel who happened to be an MIT-degreed engineer, the B-52...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Tommy Scout

    America’s first indigenous scout plane was conceived by an Englishman and borrowed heavily from European designs.  When the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917, america lacked a practical scout plane to span the gap...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Dean Hess: The Flying Parson

    Ordained minister Dean Hess dealt death from the sky as a fighter-bomber pilot, but never lost his humanity. Captain Dean Hess, a man of God piloting a lethal killing machine, scanned the German city beneath his Republic P-47D Thunderbolt....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Mitsubishi G4M: Why Betty Bombed

    Mitsubishi’s G4M bomber went by many names, but perhaps the most appropriate would have been “flaming coffin.”  We called her Betty. The American system of nicknaming World War II Japanese  aircraft gave female names to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    North American T-6: A Texan by Any Other Name

    The ubiquitous T-6 Texan flew in a dozen wars and earned a half-dozen nicknames. What American-made aircraft served in the armed forces of 55 nations in a wide variety of roles such as primary, basic or advanced trainer, fighter, bomber,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Operation Spring High: Thuds vs. SAMs

    The first attack against North Vietnamese SA-2 missile sites devolved into a debacle of dummy targets and downed aircraft, but it forced military leaders to find ways to counter the new threat. In March 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Adolf Galland: The Luftwaffe’s Fighter General

    Legendary German fighter ace Adolf Galland fought Allied pilots in the air and inept Nazi leaders on the ground. With his slicked-back black hair and matching mustache, broken nose and perennial cigar, Lieutenant General Adolf Galland was...

  • Aviation History Magazineistory Magazine

    Billy Mitchell’s Aerial Blitzkrieg

    A century ago, the U.S. Army Air Service embarked on its first major air campaign, presaging the combined-arms assaults to follow. The air campaign at St. Mihiel, France, in September 1918 was among the most important events in the history...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    MACH 3 Man: Robert J. Gilliland

    Lockheed’s chief test pilot for the SR-71 Blackbird overcame numerous inflight emergencies during his career and never failed to bring an airplane back to earth. In the early afternoon of December 22, 1964, Lockheed’s legendary...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Old Soldiers: Pacific B-17 Armed Transports

    A dozen battered B-17s served as armed transports in the Pacific, dropping supplies and strafing Japanese positions. In 1943, when hundreds of B-17s routinely sortied over Europe, a B-17 mission in the Southwest Pacific theater never...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Colonel Robert L. Scott: God’s Pilot

    Son of the South Bob Scott was a rebel with a cause: helping the United States defeat the Japanese. In 1943 General Henry H. Arnold’s secretary buzzed his inner sanctum, informing the U.S. Army Air Forces chief, “Colonel Scott is here,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Jumbo: Boeing 747

    Boeing’s 747 didn’t just revolutionize airline travel, it changed the world as we know it. If you were a hotshot airplane designer at Boeing in 1965, there was only one place you wanted to be. The aerodynamicists, the airframe...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Civil Air Patrol’s Combat Pilots

    During the early stages of World War II, the Civil Air Patrol played a vital role in helping defend American merchant ships from marauding U-boats. Natural disasters always place high demands on the nation’s emergency services. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Shear Terror

    Thunderstorm-generated wind shear was poorly understood until three major airline accidents compelled meteorologists and aviation experts to find solutions to the problem   On June 24, 1975, Eastern Airlines Flight 66, a Boeing...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bloody 100th

    The Eighth Air Force’s 100th Bomb Group earned its nickname the hard way in the brutal skies over Germany. Only one World War II U.S. Army Air Forces tail flash survives in the present-day U.S. Air Force: the Square D. Seventy-five...