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Mag: Aviation History Featured




  • Aviation History Magazine

    An Ace in the Hole: “Diz” Laird

    U.S. Navy Commander Dean “Diz” Laird went from shooting down Japanese airplanes to flying replicas of them over Pearl Harbor At a luncheon of the Distinguished Flying Cross Society in San Diego, president Chuck Sweeney let me make an...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Small Planes, Big Thrills: The Mighty Midgets

    Born with the homebuilt lightplane movement in the 1920s, the “Builder’s Class” of Formula One racers continues to thrill spectators today at Reno. The annual Reno Air Races usually evoke images of the Unlimited class: highly...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Saburo Sakai: Samurai of the Air

    Legendary Zero pilot Saburo Sakai was Japan’s most recognized ace, but few knew the man behind the legend   Saburo Sakai is probably Japan’s best-known pilot of World War II, with the possible exception of Captain Mitsuo...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Top Gun From Down Under

    Flying mainly over North Africa and in defense of his home island, Australian ace of aces Clive Caldwell shot down a mixed bag of Axis airmen, including Germans, Italians and Japanese. As with other members of the Commonwealth, Australia...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Avro Lancaster: The Night Raider

    The Avro Lancaster rained terror on Germany but never attained the B-17’s fame, even though it could carry twice the bombload over an equal distance. The brilliant comedic artist Bruce McCall illustrated a 1971 article in playboy...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Passion and the Fury: Mick Mannock

    Edward “Mick” Mannock, the Irish-born RAF ace of World War I, proved he was a man of extraordinary gifts with his leadership and combat skills....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Giving the Machine Guns Wings

    Air combat came of age during World War I with the invention of devices that allowed fighter pilots to “point and shoot”. On April 1, 1915, Roland Garros took off in a Morane-Saulnier L from an airfield in northern France, planning to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    When Birds Strike

    Since the earliest days of manned flight, pilots have sought to safely share the skies with their avian counterparts—with mixed results. On September 7, 1905, less than two years after Orville Wright became the first man to make a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Immortal Douglas DC-3

    Donald Douglas’ classic transport elevated aviation’s state of the art with its superb combination of beauty and performance. Within a decade of its 1921 founding, the Douglas Aircraft Company had built a solid reputation. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Surrounded and Outnumbered

    Against seemingly overwhelming odds, the diminutive Fourteenth Air Force held the line against the Japanese in China during World War II. After almost six months of continuous combat duty in China with the Fourteenth Air Force, Sergeant...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Who Shot Down Major Davis?

    Controversy still surrounds the death of a top American Korean War ace, but recent revelations from Chinese records have brought us closer to the truth. With 14 victories to his credit, Major George A. Davis Jr. was the highest-scoring...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hirano’s Zero

    A Mitsubishi Zero shot down at Pearl Harbor revealed surprisingly few facts about the mysterious fighter, but did yield a map that provided tantalizing clues about the location of the Japanese fleet. Shortly before 8 a.m. on December 7,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Dambusters

    After 70 years, the bold British raid on Germany’s strategic river dams remains one of history’s most audacious bombing missions—a testament to ingenious engineering and the bravery of RAF aircrews.   As a red...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Movie Stars With Wings

    Before computer-generated images, aviation films had real airplanes and real aviators at the controls....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Forty Seconds Over Eisenach

    During a disastrous mission to a German aircraft factory, the 91st Bomb Group lost six B-17s in less than a minute. The time, 1002 hours. The date, August 16, 1944. Thirty-five Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses of the 91st Bomb Group, flying...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Crewing A Combat Mariner

    Ordnance specialist Jack Christopher helped turn the stately Martin PBM-5 flying boat into an aggressive attacker of Japanese shipping. Throughout World War II, fighters, bombers and reconnaissance planes dominated headlines around the...