Mag: Aviation History Featured Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Mag: Aviation History Featured




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Jumbo: Boeing 747

    Boeing’s 747 didn’t just revolutionize airline travel, it changed the world as we know it. If you were a hotshot airplane designer at Boeing in 1965, there was only one place you wanted to be. The aerodynamicists, the airframe...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hans-Ulrich Rudel: Eagle of the Eastern Front

    Hans-Ulrich Rudel, Germany’s most highly decorated combat pilot, only shot down nine enemy aircraft, but he destroyed the equivalent of more than three Soviet tank corps Until very recently the remote forward airstrip had been deep...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Civil Air Patrol’s Combat Pilots

    During the early stages of World War II, the Civil Air Patrol played a vital role in helping defend American merchant ships from marauding U-boats. Natural disasters always place high demands on the nation’s emergency services. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Shear Terror

    Thunderstorm-generated wind shear was poorly understood until three major airline accidents compelled meteorologists and aviation experts to find solutions to the problem   On June 24, 1975, Eastern Airlines Flight 66, a Boeing...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Project Thunderstorm

    The first weather hunters put their lives on the line to gather data on the life cycle of thunderstorms. The Witch of November was laying down the law. An ominous weather front whipped the iron-green waters of Lake Erie into a froth. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Marathons in the Air

    There’s a good reason why the flight endurance record has stood since 1959: Who wants to spend more than 65 days crammed in a lightplane?   Before the advent of aerial refueling, fuel tank capacity was the main determining...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Web Update: Spirit of St. Louis 2

    The 91st anniversary of Charles Lindbergh’s record-making transatlantic flight has come and gone while Spirit of St. Louis 2, a scratch-built replica of the famous airplane, remains grounded (see “Spirit of St. Louis 2,” March 2018...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bloody 100th

    The Eighth Air Force’s 100th Bomb Group earned its nickname the hard way in the brutal skies over Germany. Only one World War II U.S. Army Air Forces tail flash survives in the present-day U.S. Air Force: the Square D. Seventy-five...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Clash of Titans Over Korea

    On April 12, 1953, two aerial champions dueled at 40,000 feet over North Korea: MiG-15 ace Semyon Fedorets and F-86 Sabre ace Joe McConnell. In recent years, Russia has confirmed a fact long suspected by United Nations airmen: Soviet...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Punching Out: Evolution of the Ejection Seat

    The faster airplanes go, the faster we need to get out of them. If necessity is the mother of invention, combat is its father. Little more than a month after Pearl Harbor, when the United States was belatedly gearing up for war,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam’s Wild Weasels

    A band of daring fliers team up in a classified program to take out the radars guiding their biggest threat—Soviet SA-2 Guideline missiles. Like many American boys who had grown up during World War II, Stan Goldstein was fascinated with...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    First Blood in Korean Skies

    In a brief but eventful combat career, the F-82 Twin Mustang proved its worth over Korea. By early 1945 it seemed obvious to the Allies that Japan would never surrender and the only way to achieve total victory in the Pacific War was by...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Death on the High Road: The Schweinfurt Raid

    In October 1943, Eighth Air Force bombers flew through hell to bomb Schweinfurt, Germany. For them, Schweinfurt meant only one thing: a killer town that was one of the most savagely defended targets along the aerial high road above...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    An Ace in the Hole: “Diz” Laird

    U.S. Navy Commander Dean “Diz” Laird went from shooting down Japanese airplanes to flying replicas of them over Pearl Harbor At a luncheon of the Distinguished Flying Cross Society in San Diego, president Chuck Sweeney let me make an...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Small Planes, Big Thrills: The Mighty Midgets

    Born with the homebuilt lightplane movement in the 1920s, the “Builder’s Class” of Formula One racers continues to thrill spectators today at Reno. The annual Reno Air Races usually evoke images of the Unlimited class: highly...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Saburo Sakai: Samurai of the Air

    Legendary Zero pilot Saburo Sakai was Japan’s most recognized ace, but few knew the man behind the legend   Saburo Sakai is probably Japan’s best-known pilot of World War II, with the possible exception of Captain Mitsuo...