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Mag: Aviation History Featured




  • Aviation History Editorial

    Great Wars: Letter from Aviation History Magazine

    How long does it take us to learn the lessons of past wars? A century ago, on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, World War I ended with the signing of the armistice between the Allies and Germany. In hindsight, it...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Operation Spring High: Thuds vs. SAMs

    The first attack against North Vietnamese SA-2 missile sites devolved into a debacle of dummy targets and downed aircraft, but it forced military leaders to find ways to counter the new threat. In March 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Adolf Galland: The Luftwaffe’s Fighter General

    Legendary German fighter ace Adolf Galland fought Allied pilots in the air and inept Nazi leaders on the ground. With his slicked-back black hair and matching mustache, broken nose and perennial cigar, Lieutenant General Adolf Galland was...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    MACH 3 Man: Robert J. Gilliland

    Lockheed’s chief test pilot for the SR-71 Blackbird overcame numerous inflight emergencies during his career and never failed to bring an airplane back to earth. In the early afternoon of December 22, 1964, Lockheed’s legendary...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Old Soldiers: Pacific B-17 Armed Transports

    A dozen battered B-17s served as armed transports in the Pacific, dropping supplies and strafing Japanese positions. In 1943, when hundreds of B-17s routinely sortied over Europe, a B-17 mission in the Southwest Pacific theater never...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Jumbo: Boeing 747

    Boeing’s 747 didn’t just revolutionize airline travel, it changed the world as we know it. If you were a hotshot airplane designer at Boeing in 1965, there was only one place you wanted to be. The aerodynamicists, the airframe...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hans-Ulrich Rudel: Eagle of the Eastern Front

    Hans-Ulrich Rudel, Germany’s most highly decorated combat pilot, only shot down nine enemy aircraft, but he destroyed the equivalent of more than three Soviet tank corps Until very recently the remote forward airstrip had been deep...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Civil Air Patrol’s Combat Pilots

    During the early stages of World War II, the Civil Air Patrol played a vital role in helping defend American merchant ships from marauding U-boats. Natural disasters always place high demands on the nation’s emergency services. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Shear Terror

    Thunderstorm-generated wind shear was poorly understood until three major airline accidents compelled meteorologists and aviation experts to find solutions to the problem   On June 24, 1975, Eastern Airlines Flight 66, a Boeing...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Project Thunderstorm

    The first weather hunters put their lives on the line to gather data on the life cycle of thunderstorms. The Witch of November was laying down the law. An ominous weather front whipped the iron-green waters of Lake Erie into a froth. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Marathons in the Air

    There’s a good reason why the flight endurance record has stood since 1959: Who wants to spend more than 65 days crammed in a lightplane?   Before the advent of aerial refueling, fuel tank capacity was the main determining...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Web Update: Spirit of St. Louis 2

    The 91st anniversary of Charles Lindbergh’s record-making transatlantic flight has come and gone while Spirit of St. Louis 2, a scratch-built replica of the famous airplane, remains grounded (see “Spirit of St. Louis 2,” March 2018...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bloody 100th

    The Eighth Air Force’s 100th Bomb Group earned its nickname the hard way in the brutal skies over Germany. Only one World War II U.S. Army Air Forces tail flash survives in the present-day U.S. Air Force: the Square D. Seventy-five...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Clash of Titans Over Korea

    On April 12, 1953, two aerial champions dueled at 40,000 feet over North Korea: MiG-15 ace Semyon Fedorets and F-86 Sabre ace Joe McConnell. In recent years, Russia has confirmed a fact long suspected by United Nations airmen: Soviet...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Punching Out: Evolution of the Ejection Seat

    The faster airplanes go, the faster we need to get out of them. If necessity is the mother of invention, combat is its father. Little more than a month after Pearl Harbor, when the United States was belatedly gearing up for war,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam’s Wild Weasels

    A band of daring fliers team up in a classified program to take out the radars guiding their biggest threat—Soviet SA-2 Guideline missiles. Like many American boys who had grown up during World War II, Stan Goldstein was fascinated with...