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Aviation History Magazine




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    We Guide to Strike

    Gil Cohen’s ASAA “Award of Distinction” tribute to British Pathfinders. Gil Cohen’s painting We Guide to Strike is an example of his ability to offer insight into the emotions and character of his subjects while utilizing their...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    MiG: Learning By Trial and Error

    The design bureau’s early years were marked by as many failures as successes, but the company would go on to produce some of history’s greatest fighter aircraft. Alesksei N. ”Lesha” Grinchik had only seconds to live. As he bottomed...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Britain’s ‘Bloody Paralyzer’

    Frederick Handley Page produced the RAF’s first successful strategic bombers. The first really large bombers to be produced in substantial numbers and employed in massed formations in a coordinated strategic offensive, the Handley Page...

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    Clippers Circle the Globe

    The attack on Pearl Harbor forced one Pan Am crew to attempt a round-the-world flight. It was a few minutes before 6 a.m. and still very dark on January 6, 1942, when the control tower at New York’s LaGuardia Airport received a radio...

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    Ace of Aces: Richard I. Bong

    Quiet, shy and introverted on the ground; aggressive, hostile and fearless in the air. Major General George C. Kenney had had enough. Ever since a certain pilot arrived at Hamilton Field for combat training on May 6, 1942, he had been...

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    ‘Flying Classroom’ Reinvented

    Convair T-29A back on duty at the Strategic Air & Space Museum. After nearly a quarter-century in retirement, the Strategic Air & Space Museum’s Convair (Consolidated Vultee) T-29A is once again ready for duty in its original...

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    Curtiss A-18 Shrike

    Though less successful than Messerschmitt’s Bf-110, the A-18 was proof that a six-ton twin-engine attack plane could do the job. The time-worn formulas of World War I— wood and fabric construction, open cockpits, fixed undercarriage...

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    ‘All Blood Runs Red’

    Eugene Bullard made history as the world’s first black pilot. At the Café Copoule in Paris in the spring of 1916, three American soldiers of the French Foreign Legion were commiserating with a fourth who was convalescing from a shrapnel...

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    Aviation History Letters from Readers- March 2007

    Artillery and Gliders As a recent subscriber to Aviation History, I found two articles in the July 2006 issue of great interest. Regarding Kelly Bell’s feature “Mustang Wrangler George Preddy,” I am quite sure the unit that shot him...

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    Able and Baker

    May 28, 1959, 40 miles North of Antigua— Two small monkeys splash down in the nose cone of a Jupiter missile. The rocket had traveled 1,700 miles in 15 minutes, and with their successful recovery by the U.S. Navy tug Kiowa, the two...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Fritz Opel’s Manned Rocket

    June 11, 1928, Wasserkrupe, Germany— The world’s first rocket-propelled manned aircraft took to the sky. The sailplane, designed by Alexander Lippisch and called the Ente (German for “duck”), was powered by two black-powder rockets...

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    Airware Review: Cold War Gone Hot

    Wings Over Europe asks “What if?” The Cold War is one part of history rarely visited by aviation simulations. Perhaps scenarios where American Navy fighters stared down Russian bombers and ended without any shots being fired would make...

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    Aviation History Book Review: I’ll Fly Away

    I’ll Fly Away: A World War II Pilot’s Lifetime of Adventures From Biplanes to Jumbo Jets by Jack Race with William F. Hallstead, University of Scranton Press, Scranton, Pa., 2006, $20 softcover. Jack Race soloed in an Aeronca C-3 at...

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    Aviation History Book Review: Dictatorship of the Air

    Scott W. Palmer, author of Dictatorship of the Air: Culture and the Fate of Modern Russia (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2006, $40), has accomplished that most difficult task, writing a readable scholarly book. Well accoutered with...

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    The U.S. Navy’s Last Flying Boat

    Development of Martin’s P6M was delayed until its time ran out. Middle River, Maryland, July 14, 1955: Martin Aircraft’s XP6M-1 Seamaster, the world’s first jet-powered seaplane, taxied into the river for the first flight of what one...

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    Interview: Three Wars and Admirals’ Stripes

    Q: USS Hornet was sunk during the Battle of Santa Cruz, but you were on the aircraft carrier Enterprise, right? A: Yes, however, when I got back to our task force, I saw a carrier in flames and feared it was Enterprise. It turned out to be...