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American History

The American experience comes alive through writing, outstanding photography & artwork. American History is the leading popular magazine that explores the rich texture of the American experience through engaging writing and outstanding photography and artwork. The magazine’s lively storytelling, thought-provoking essays and more bring America’s past alive in every issue.




  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: Treacherous Beauty

    Treacherous Beauty: Peggy Shippen, The Woman Behind Benedict Arnold’s Plot to Betray America by Mark Jacob and Stephen H. Case; Lyons Press Not all women rediscovered by history turn out to be heroines. A prime example: the notorious...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: Strom Thurmond’s America

    Strom Thurmond’s America by Joseph Crespino; Hill & Wang Strom Thurmond, one-time presidential candidate for the “Dixiecrat” Party and longtime filibustering segregationist U.S. senator, came to be seen as a toothless anachronism...

  • American History Magazine

    6 Million Mules

    How we ran the nation before it became mechanized. Here is the history of the American mule in numbers. In 1786, there were zero—at least none on record in the new United States. In 2007, there were 28,000. But in 1925—the very peak of...

  • American History Magazine

    The Wild Ones

    Seminoles were wary of the white man—and his camera— so they hid for decades in the Everglades. The Spanish of La Florida called every native they encountered cimarrón—runaway, wild one—a word later corrupted to “seminole.”...

  • American History Magazine

    As American as Modern Architecture

    Harry McCawley looks and sounds like a small-town character, in the best tradition. “It billed itself as the world’s fastest growing newspaper,” he recalled of his employer, The Republic, when he was hired 49 years ago. McCawley, 71,...

  • American History Magazine

    Oil Rush

    At either Titusville or Oil City the stranger finds himself in a new world. The objects which he is too apt to touch, in spite of all precautions, have a greasy, clammy feel. His nostrils are assailed by gaseous odors, such as they...

  • American History Magazine

    Thomas Jefferson, Slave Master

    New research casts the founding father in a different light. WHEN THE MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE, a hero of the American Revolution, returned for a triumphal tour of the United States in 1824, he stayed a fortnight with Thomas Jefferson at...

  • American History Magazine

    Encounter: Helen Keller Touches Mark Twain’s Heart

    ONE WINTER 1894, a dozen prominent men, including two of SUNDAY in America’s greatest writers, William Dean Howells and Mark Twain, gathered at the Manhattan home of magazine editor Laurence Hutton, who had summoned them to meet an...

  • American History Magazine

    Gazette- American History October 2012

    Will an Old Clue Lead to the Lost Colony? X DID NOT MARK THE SPOT— and maybe that’s why it took more than 400 years for someone to check out a small patched area on a 1586 map of Virginia that may show where the legendary Lost Colony...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: 20th Century With Mike Wallace

    20th Century With Mike Wallace: America at War 10 episodes, 470 minutes; Athena Nearly 100,000 Americans have died in undeclared wars since the end of World War II. This often discomfiting series takes an unvarnished look at the hows and...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: Citizen Soldier

    Citizen Soldier: A Life of Harry S. Truman By Aida D. Donald; Basic Books This new biography is like our 33rd president: short and to the point. Truman, David McCullough’s 1,100-page tome, is exhaustive, but often loses the...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: African American Civil War Museum

    African American Civil War Museum Washington, D.C.; www.afroamcivilwar.org The African American Civil War Museum, now 12 years old, is tucked away on Vermont Avenue, NW, off U Street, the historic heart of Washington’s black community....

  • American History Magazine

    First Encounter

    The Pilgrims were hungry and weak from scurvy after two months at sea by the time the Mayflower anchored in the icy waters on the bay side of Cape Cod in the winter of 1620. Miles Standish led a small group of explorers on desperate...

  • American History Magazine

    Declaration of Freedom

    As we approach the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, 11 thoughtful voices explain why it still matters to all of us. At the height of the Civil War, on January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued an...

  • American History Magazine

    George Bellows- Guts and Glory

    The muscular art of painter George Bellows, like his nation, is a study in contrasts. The kid was all-American, a college dropout from Ohio and a minor league baseball player. He showed up in New York City in 1904 and KO’d the art world....

  • American History Magazine

    Grant Takes on the Klan

    Ulysses Grant hadn’t expected the presidency to be easy, but he didn’t think it would be this hard. He thought the hard work of forging peace with the South had been finished at Appomattox—that the generous terms he accorded General...