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American History: January/February ’98 Letters

SERVED UNDER JOHN PAUL JONESMy grandfather, Lt. William Seach, was a flesh-and-blood hero to all of us grandchildren growing up. An emigrant from England with a third-grade education, he gained his citizenship...
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American History: March ’98 Letters

1919 ARMORED CADILLACAn interesting prelude to the transcontinental trip by military motor described in "From D.C. to the Golden Gate" (November/December 1997 issue) was conducted by Colonel Royal P. Davidson....
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American History: October 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryFrank Sinatra never met George Gershwin. When the 38-year-old composer died in 1937, Sinatra was just a skinny young man from Hoboken, New Jersey, with dreams of hitting the big time. It...
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American History: December ’98 Letters

EDITH, NOT ELLENIn "How the Airmail Got Off the Ground," from your August issue, President Woodrow Wilson's wife is referred to as Ellen. In fact, Ellen Axson Wilson died in 1914, and the following year the...
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American History: May/June ’98 Letters

THE SKIPPY DEBATEIn the "Time Capsule" section of your February 1998 issue you wrote about the identification of the B-17 known as Skippy. I think I may be able to help.An air force emblem and the letter "F"...
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American History: March 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryIt's sometimes surprising how much death can help a reputation--and a long life can hurt one. Take the cases of James Longstreet and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, who served as Robert...
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American History: August ’98 Letters

USING AN OLD TRICKIn "The Optical Aleutian," featured in your March 1998 issue, author Russell Martin laments the needless Kiska campaign, and well he might. Admiral Thomas Kinkaid's remarks that it would be a...
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American History: December 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistorySometimes when we put together an issue of American History we discover that two articles with little apparently in common actually run along parallel tracks. In this issue, for instance, we...
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American History: April ’97 Letters

REED GIVEN TOO MUCH CREDITI submit that readers of your article, "Did the Mosquito Do It?" should also turn to "The Myth of Walter Reed," a section in Lawrence Altman's 1987 book Who Goes First? to decide for...
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American History: October ’97 Letters

DRUMMER BOY MONUMENTMark Dunkelman's article on Sergeant Amos Humiston in your May/June 1997 issue has an interesting sidebar. While it is true that the monument to Humiston is "the only one on the battlefield...
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American History: December ’97 Letters

WHO SCULPTED LINCOLN BUST?I was rather surprised at the article in your July/August 1997 issue about the nineteenth-century American woman sculptor, Vinnie Ream, sometimes called Vinnie Ream Hoxie. The...
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American History: April 1997 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryAs we were preparing this issue of American History, which includes on page 16 an article by Mark Dunkelman about Amos Humiston, a Union soldier who died during the Battle of Gettysburg,...
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American History: February ’97 Letters

WIVES DESERVE CREDITLet me give you my reflections about Mr. Haydock's excellent article on the G.I. Bill in the September/October 1996 issue of American History. His description of the college years...
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American History: August 1997 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryOne of my fondest memories from the 15 years that my family and I lived on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, is of a summer day in 1975 when we and several carloads of friends set out to "do"...
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American History: April ’97 Letters

A TALENTED AND GRACIOUS LADYJoseph Gustaitis's article on Antoinette Perry in your March/April 1997 issue reminded me of one of my late mother's favorite successes as a literary agent. In November 1939,...