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American History: October 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryFrank Sinatra never met George Gershwin. When the 38-year-old composer died in 1937, Sinatra was just a skinny young man from Hoboken, New Jersey, with dreams of hitting the big time. It...
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American History: December ’98 Letters

EDITH, NOT ELLENIn "How the Airmail Got Off the Ground," from your August issue, President Woodrow Wilson's wife is referred to as Ellen. In fact, Ellen Axson Wilson died in 1914, and the following year the...
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American History: May/June ’98 Letters

THE SKIPPY DEBATEIn the "Time Capsule" section of your February 1998 issue you wrote about the identification of the B-17 known as Skippy. I think I may be able to help.An air force emblem and the letter "F"...
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American History: March 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryIt's sometimes surprising how much death can help a reputation--and a long life can hurt one. Take the cases of James Longstreet and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, who served as Robert...
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American History: August ’98 Letters

USING AN OLD TRICKIn "The Optical Aleutian," featured in your March 1998 issue, author Russell Martin laments the needless Kiska campaign, and well he might. Admiral Thomas Kinkaid's remarks that it would be a...
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American History: December 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistorySometimes when we put together an issue of American History we discover that two articles with little apparently in common actually run along parallel tracks. In this issue, for instance, we...
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American History: May/June 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryMagazine editors love a good anniversary. Give us an event that happened 50, 100, or 200 years ago and chances are we'll find someone to write about it. There's something seductive about a...
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American History: August 1998 From the Editor

Thoughts on History"It has been a splendid little war, begun with the highest motives, carried on with magnificent intelligence and spirit, favored by that fortune that loves the brave." So said Secretary of...
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American History: December 1997 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryThis issue of American History has a lot to do with distances, specifically the difficulty bridging them. The United States is a large country, as I learned from experience the first time I...
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American History: April ’97 Letters

SPEED IN VICKSBURGAfter reading Jerry Potter's article "A Tragic Postscript" in your November/December 1996 issue, I journeyed to Vicksburg, Mississippi, to visit my parents. That evening while reading the...
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American History: February 1997 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryAs you read issue, you will notice a new logo appearing at the end of "Code Talkers" by William R. Wilson. In the future, this symbol will be used in each issue to signify that an article...
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American History: August 1997 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryAt the end of a 1980 interview with William R. Wilson, which begins on page 48 of this issue, the late General James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle declared: "I'd never want to relive my life. I...
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American History: April 1997 From the Editor

Thoughts on HistoryIn It Happened in Brooklyn: An Oral History of Growing Up in the Borough in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, Alan Lelchuk, the son of a Russian immigrant to the United States, is quoted as...
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American History: April ’97 Letters

REED GIVEN TOO MUCH CREDITI submit that readers of your article, "Did the Mosquito Do It?" should also turn to "The Myth of Walter Reed," a section in Lawrence Altman's 1987 book Who Goes First? to decide for...
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American History: October ’97 Letters

DRUMMER BOY MONUMENTMark Dunkelman's article on Sergeant Amos Humiston in your May/June 1997 issue has an interesting sidebar. While it is true that the monument to Humiston is "the only one on the battlefield...