June 2017 Table of Contents | HistoryNet MENU

June 2017 Table of Contents

By HistoryNet Staff
3/23/2017 • Wild West Magazine

FEATURES

Cover Story

SCARS OF CUSTER’S DEFEAT
By Stan “Tex” Banash
The nation, especially Libbie Custer’s hometown of Monroe, Mich., suffered a severe blow in 1876

THE HUMAN WILDCAT
By John Boessenecker
Free-ranging bandido Juan Soto was terminado soon after Sheriff Harry Morse tracked him down

THE KILL EAGLE MYTH
By John Koster
The Sihasapa Lakota chief gave an early if not wholly reliable account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn

ON THE OUTLAW TRAIL
By John Flood
Storekeeper turned detective M.F. Leech tracked Sam Bass and the other Big Springs train robbers

LAST MAN STANDING
By John Koster
Medal of Honor recipient Charles Windolph outlived all fellow 7th U.S. Cavalry survivors of the Little Bighorn

SEX, LIES AND BETRAYAL
By Peter Brand
Detective J.W. Hawkins used every trick in the book to bring a gang of Colorado train robbers to justice


On the Cover: 
Elizabeth Custer married George when he was a Union general during the Civil War. After his death as a lieutenant colonel with the 7th U.S. Cavalry in June 1876 she remained true to her husband another 57 years. (National Archives; colorization by Brian Walker)

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DEPARTMENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

LETTERS

ROUNDUP

INTERVIEW
By Johnny D. Boggs
Peter Cozzens recasts the narrative of the Western Indian wars

WESTERNERS
There’s no spit and polish to this Arizona Territory soldier

GUNFIGHTERS AND LAWMEN
By J.R. Sanders
Greed claimed William Warren, the only Los Angeles police chief killed in the line of duty

PIONEERS AND SETTLERS
By John Koster
Did unreconstructed Rebel Frank Huston fight Custer at the Little Bighorn?

WESTERN ENTERPRISE
By Jim Pettengill
Lumber made the Riordan brothers rich, but God made them generous

ART OF THE WEST
By Johnny D. Boggs
Oil baron Thomas Gilcrease gave Tulsa great Western art

INDIAN LIFE
By John P. McWilliams
Geronimo once said his wife Huera was “the bravest of Apache women”

STYLE
Showcasing the West in art, film, fashion and more

COLLECTIONS
By Linda Wommack
When the whistles blow, head to the Colorado Railroad Museum

GUNS OF THE WEST
By George Layman
A pocket was as good as a holster for small-frame Colts

GHOST TOWNS
By Jim Pettengill
Copper was king in the company town of Sasco, Arizona

REVIEWS
Award-winning California author John Boessenecker considers books and films about outlaws in the Golden State. Plus reviews of recent books

GO WEST
North America’s highest railway climbs Pikes Peak, Colorado


ONLINE EXTRAS

WILD BILL HICKOK: PISTOLEER, PEACE OFFICER AND FOLK HERO
As Wild Bill biographer Joseph G. Rosa reminds us in this article, James Butler Hickok was a legend in his own time. He made his mark in such Kansas cow towns as Hays City and Abilene, but his first recorded shootout came on July 12, 1861, at Rock Creek, Nebraska Territory

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