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How effective were Rangers during the French & Indian War?

Originally published on HistoryNet.com. Published Online: November 03, 2010 
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How effective were Rangers during the French & Indian War?


9 Responses to “How effective were Rangers during the French & Indian War?”


  1. 1
    Darryl Raby says:

    As I understand it, they were only marginally effective

  2. 2
    G. Hopkins says:

    To determine the effectiveness of the Rangers we first have know what their purpose was. That was to gain intelligence. Since the crown had no Indian allies with which to speak, the Rangers became the eyes of the frontier army. In this capacity, they worked extremely well. Rogers' Rangers would continually get prisoners for interrogation and spy upon the enemy. Much more reliable than Indians and since they were trained resonably well could give reliable information. As long as the crown used them in that capacity the Rangers had a fearsome reputation. Obviously, that wasn't always the case.

  3. 3
    harry Berman says:

    If we give validitiy to the historical backgroung in Kenneth Roberts novels,we must assume that the rangers were the answer to the french use of indians and gave us a force that could work with indians who wanted to work with the british. They also established the credibility of colonials as a fighting force.

  4. 4
    Shawn Fox says:

    Rogers Rangers & other organizations like them throughout the colonies were effective in scouting, intelligence gathering & early warning. When it came to 'formal' operations they all proved less effective… it was not what they were trained & organized to do.

  5. 5
    Mark H says:

    marginal

  6. 6
    Pierre Corbeil says:

    They were created as a response to the very effective raiding strategy of the French and Indians. The French added discipline and military objectives to the Indian techniques for moving and fighting in the environment of North America.
    Like the Rangers, they were not suited to the more formal methods of the last war (1755-1763), though they could be very deadly,e.g., during the siege of Québec

  7. 7
    Ranger John says:

    scouting, intelligence gathering & early warning. Being a small force, they were able to move through the countryside without detection, thus givng them the edge over the more conventional army.

  8. 8
    Anthony lattimore says:

    Rogers' Rangers was initially a provincial company from the colony of New Hampshire, attached to the British Army during the Seven Years War called the French and Indian War in the United States.

  9. 9
    Calder says:

    Deadly. They were The British special forces who did raids and spy missions on the Indians.



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