December 2017 Table of Contents | HistoryNet MENU

December 2017 Table of Contents

By HistoryNet Staff
9/28/2017 • Wild West Magazine

FEATURES

Cover Story

FINDING BLAME AT WOUNDED KNEE
By John Koster
Major General Nelson Miles had misgivings about the conduct of Colonel James Forsyth and the 7th U.S. Cavalry

IN THE FIGHT WITH FETTERMAN
By John H. Monnett
No soldiers survived the December 1866 clash, leaving White Bull and other Indian participants to tell the tale

PETEY BIGELOW’S BIGGEST SCOOP
By Matthew Bernstein
William Randolph Hearst sent his star reporter to ferret out fugitive train robbers John Sontag and Chris Evans

A TALE OF TWO TERRITORIES
By Gregory Michno
Military and civilian authorities in New Mexico and Colorado addressed their “Indian troubles” quite differently

THE BRIDE AND THE BRIGAND
By John Boessenecker
The mail-order bride had seen her intended only once before—she was on a stagecoach, and he wore a mask

REQUIEM FOR A COWBOY POET
By Peggy Sanders
Badger Clark spent time in a Cuban jail and on an Arizona ranch before becoming South Dakota’s “poet lariat”


On the Cover: 
When he died in 1955, reportedly at age 96, Minneconjou Sioux Chief Dewey Beard (aka Iron Hail) was the last known Lakota survivor of the Dec. 29, 1890, clash at Wounded Knee. (National Archives; photo illustration by Brian Walker)

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DEPARTMENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

LETTERS

ROUNDUP

INTERVIEW
By Candy Moulton
Author Tom Clavin profiles Bat Masterson, Wyatt Earp and other Dodge City figures

WESTERNERS
New Mexico gunmen targeted Lincoln County Sheriff William Brady and perhaps one of his sons

GUNFIGHTERS AND LAWMEN
By Don Chaput
Arizona Ranger Jeff Kidder died south of the border in decidedly unofficial circumstances

PIONEERS AND SETTLERS
By John Koster
Captain George Sokalski challenged a fellow officer to a duel but got a court-martial instead

WESTERN ENTERPRISE
By Chuck Lyons
Copper was king in Butte, Montana, and queen in Bisbee, Arizona

ART OF THE WEST
By Jim Winnerman
Jim Nelson’s colorful canvases are alive with Indian spiritual symbolism

INDIAN LIFE
By John Koster
Half-Sioux, half-French Army scout “Little Bat” Garnier escaped death at Wounded Knee, but it found him in a Crawford, Nebraska, saloon

STYLE
Showcasing the West in art, film, fashion and more

COLLECTIONS
By Linda Wommack
The Nelson Museum in Cheyenne preserves a trove of Old West artifacts

GUNS OF THE WEST
By George Layman
German-born brothers Frank and George Freund were among the best gunsmiths who ventured west

GHOST TOWNS
By Les Kruger
Piedmont, Wyoming, catered to workers on the transcontinental railroad

REVIEWS
John Koster highlights Wounded Knee–related books, videos and songs. Plus reviews of recent books and the AMC TV Western series The Son

GO WEST
Franciscans made first footfall in California at Mission San Diego


ONLINE EXTRAS

PHILIP WELLS:
WOUNDED AT WOUNDED KNEE

Forty-year-old U.S. Army interpreter Wells found himself in the midst of the initial fray on Dec. 29, 1890, when a Lakota warrior thrust a sharp knife in his face, leaving his nose dangling by a strip of skin, and Wells responded by shooting his attacker dead with a rifle

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