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Battle Of Fredericksburg Pictures

Battle Of Fredericksburg Pictures during Battle Of Fredericksburg of the American Civil War

This photograph shows the 110th Pennsylvania Infantry’s camp near Falmouth, VA, in December 1862. The Union army encampment near Falmouth afforded the men a clear view of Fredericksburg and Confederate troop preparations while they waited for the pontoon bridges to arrive. Image from the Library of Congress.
This Edwin Forbes drawing of the Union army winter camp near Stoneman’s Switch in Falmouth was created after the battle, on January 25, 1863, and depicts a heavy snowfall that may be similar to what delayed the battle in December. Image from the Library of Congress.
This 1977 photograph shows the western facade of of Chatham House, which faces the Rappahannock River and has a clear view of Fredericksburg. The mansion and surrounding estate were used as Union officer headquarters at various times during the Civil War; General Edwin Sumner used it as his headquarters and General Ambrose Burnside observed the battle from Chatham while artillery shelled the Confederates in Fredericksburg from adjacent bluffs. Following the battle, Chatham was used as a Union hospital; Clara Barton volunteered helping army surgeons there. Image from the Library of Congress.
This 1884 J. W. Evans engraving of a Rufus F. Zogbaum work shows the bombardment of Fredericksburg on December 11, 1862. Image from the Library of Congress.
This Alfred Waud sketch shows two pontoon bridges being built across the Rappahannock River on December 11, 1862. Waud was a staff artist for Harper’s Weekly; he attended every battle of the Army of the Potomac between the First Battle of Bull Run and the Siege of Petersburg. Image from the Library of Congress.
This May 1863 photograph taken by Timothy O’Sullivan, a member of Alexander Gardner’s stuidio, shows two pontoon bridges over the Rappahannock River that were used in the Battle of Fredericksburg. Image from the Library of Congress.
This 1888 chromolithograph shows the Army of the Potomac building pontoon bridges to cross the Rappahannock River on the morning of December 13, 1862. General Ambrose Burnside is depicted on his horse on the right side of the print while Frederickburg is ablaze in the background. Image from the Library of Congress.
Uebergang-uber-den-Rappahannock
Uebergang-uber-den-Rappahannock
This German print published in by Oehmigke & Riemschneider showing Union infantry crossing the Rappahannock demonstrates Europe’s interest, often personal, in the Civil War–some 1.3 million Germans lived in the U.S. and served on both sides. Image from the Library of Congress.
This Alfred Waud engraving was published in the January 3, 1863 edition of Harper’s Weekly. It shows Union troops advancing through the streets of Fredericksburg under Confederate fire. Image from the Library of Congress.
This Arthur Lumley sketch shows Union troops plundering Fredericksburg the night of December 12-13, 1862. Inscribed on the back of the sketch: “Friday Night in Fredericksburg. This night the city was in the wildest confusion sacked by the union troops = houses burned down furniture scattered in the streets = men pillaging in all directions a fit scene for the French revolution and a discrace[sic]to the Union Arms[?] this is my view of what I saw. Lumley.” Image from the Library of Congress.
This Alfred Waud sketch is titled “Gallant Charge of Humphrey’s Division at the Battle of Fredericksburg.” General Andrew Humphrey’s Division made the last major assault against Sunken Road during the battle, wading through the wounded from previous assaults to be raked by fresh Confederate soldiers. Image from the Library of Congress.
This 1862 lithograph from Currier & Ives shows rows of Union troops marching toward Marye’s Heights. The caption under title says: “This battle shows what undaunted courage, the Lion-hearted Army of the Potomac always meets its foes. After forcing the passage of the Rappahannock on the 11th in the face of a murderous fire from concealed Rebels, and taking possession of Fredericksburg on the 12th, on the morning of the 13th the Army rushed with desperate valor on the intrenchments of the enemy, and thousands of its dead and dying, tell of the fearful strife which raged till night put an end to the carnage. Though driven back by an intrenched and hidden foe, the Soldiers of the North are still as ready to meet the Traitors of the South, as in their days of proudest victory.” Image from the Library of Congress.
This 1894 print of an Allen C. Redwood sketch shows Confederate troops under Brigadier Generals Thomas Cobb and General Joseph Kewshaw behind the stone wall at the foot of Marye’s Heights on December 13. Cobb was mortally wounded that day inside the Stephens house near the Sunken Road on Marye’s Heights. Image from the Library of Congress.
This photograph was taken December 13, 1862. Note the roof of a collapsed building in the foreground. Image from the Library of Congress.
This 1863 photograph shows Marye’s Heights with soldiers, horses, and cannons. Marye’s Heights was the scene of the Second Battle of Fredericksburg on May 3, 1863, which was part of the Battle of Chancellorsville. Image from the Library of Congress.
This 1862 photograph shows the ruins of the Barnard House below Fredericksburg. Image from the Library of Congress.
This Alfred Waud sketch shows the Union signal telegraph train being set up for use during the battle. Image from the Library of Congress.

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