Armchair General- Letters from Readers March 2013 | HistoryNet MENU

Armchair General- Letters from Readers March 2013

7/20/2017 • HistoryNet

Found: Ike’s “Missing” Steel Pot

In Action’ Steel Pot?” (p. 6) noted the absence of World War II photos showing General Dwight D. Eisenhower wearing a steel helmet, since Ike habitually wore a service hat or overseas cap. ACG’s July 2012 Mailbag department, the item “Ike’s ‘Missing in Recently, however, two ACG readers discovered a March 17, 1943, photograph taken at Fériana, Tunisia, during the North Africa campaign, that, according to the accompanying caption, is “a rare photo of Ike wearing a helmet” while meeting with British General Sir Harold Alexander and Lieutenant General George S. Patton Jr.

We at ACG thank Henry G. Meier of Indianapolis, who came across the image in Michael Korda’s Ike: An American Hero, and Joseph J. Grasela Jr. of Kansas, who found the same photo in Rick Atkinson’s An Army at Dawn, the first volume in Atkinson’s superb World War II trilogy.

503d PIR at “The Rock”

I enjoy reading your magazine very much and find it very informative. However, I want to take exception to your captioned photo in the September 2012 Mailbag (p. 7) indicating 11th Airborne Division landing and reclaiming Corregidor Island. The unit that jumped on Corregidor was 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), a separate Regimental Combat Team, not part of 11th Airborne Division. I was a member of 503d PIR in Vietnam and the unit still carried a large piece of the island symbolizing “The Rock,” as Corregidor is known. “The Rock” is the regimental nickname and appears on the 503d regimental crest (Distinctive Unit Insignia).

PATRICK L. POWERS

LOUISVILLE, KY

As Powers points out, the 503d jumped on “The Rock” February 16, 1945, as a separate Regimental Combat Team. The unit was assigned to 11th Airborne Division for five years (1951-56) in the post-World War II era, and its distinguished history (1941 to present) includes numerous intense combat actions. Fourteen members of the 503d have been awarded the Medal of Honor, including Staff Sergeant Salvatore Giunta, who received his medal in November 2010 for heroism in Afghanistan in 2007.

ACG’s “Wide Variety”

I enjoy your magazine due to the fact it covers a wide variety of information, history and topics that other magazines do not. Thank you and best wishes.

DONALD L. WODASH SR.

COLONEL (RET.), ARIZONA

ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

Thank you, Colonel Wodash, both for your service and for reminding readers that each issue of Armchair General encompasses a wide range of topics and eras. We remain committed to bringing our readers the very best authors and articles covering all aspects of military history.

East Front Fan

Your November 2012 What Next, General? article, “Manstein at Stalingrad, 1942,” was an excellent, in-depth examination of German Field Marshal Erich von Manstein’s attempt to rescue the trapped 6th Army at Stalingrad. I particularly enjoyed reading the alternative courses of action – and the “what-if” questions they raise – and also the historical analysis at the end. I’m very pleased Armchair General is presenting such excellent articles on World War II’s Eastern Front. I hope to read more in ACG about this greatest clash of arms in military history!

EAST FRONT FAN

You are not alone in your desire to read more about the Eastern Front. Recently, via an armchairgeneral.com web poll, we asked readers which World War II theater they find most interesting, and over 40 percent of respondents chose the Eastern Front! The Western Front came in at a distant second, with 24 percent of the votes; the Pacific Theater garnered 16 percent; and the Mediterranean Theater received 9 percent. Twelve percent of respondents indicated they had no preference.

Author Attribution

In the November 2012 issue of ACG, we inadvertently left out the name of the co-author of Battlefield Detective, “The Case of the Small Lead Ball.” Although Glenn Foard was acknowledged along with Doug Scott in the biography at the end of the article, Foard’s name was missing from the byline shown under the title. We regret this oversight.

 

Originally published in the March 2013 issue of Armchair General.

, , , ,



Sponsored Content: