Paid Advertisement
Historynet/feed historynet feedback facebook link Weider History Group RSS feed Weider Subscriptions Historynet Home page

200th Anniversary of the Map That Made New York City

By Gerald D. Swick 
Originally published on HistoryNet.com. Published Online: March 21, 2011 
Print Friendly
0 comments FONT +  FONT -

Don't forget to wish a happy 200th birthday to—um, well, to a piece of paper. But that piece of paper laid out an idea that made possible the development of one of the world's greatest cities.

On March 22, 1811, the street commissioners of what would become the great city of New York certified the Commissioners' Map and Survey of Manhattan Island, which laid out the city in rigid, 90-degree grids comprising 2,000 blocks of equal size—which would extend the city miles beyond its March 1811 boundaries and encompass salt marshes, forests and privately owned lands.

The plan also called for nearly 2,000 acres of landfills to be created. Today, those old landfills sometimes give up ghosts of the past, like the 18th-century ship unearthed in Manhattan in July 2010.

The design was the conceived by John Randel, Jr., the New York City street commissioners' secretary, surveyor and chief engineer. Far from being universally lauded as a far-sighted design, it often led residents to pelt Randel and his workers with rotten produce.

Click here to read The New York Times' tribute to the map that made New York City possible and to see an interactive map of the city's astonishing growth on and around Manhattan Island.

 


Recommended


Leave a Reply

Human Verification: In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Related Articles


History Net Images Spacer
Paid Advertisement
Paid Advertisement
History Net Daily Activities
History net Spacer
History net Spacer
Historynet Spacer
HISTORYNET READERS' POLL

Which of these wars resulted in the most surprising underdog upset?

View Results | See previous polls

Loading ... Loading ...
History net Spacer
STAY CONNECTED WITH US
RSS Feed Daily Email Update
History net Spacer History net Spacer
Paid Advertisement

Paid Advertisement
What is HistoryNet?

The HistoryNet.com is brought to you by Weider History, the world's largest publisher of history magazines. HistoryNet.com contains daily features, photo galleries and over 5,000 articles originally published in our various magazines.

If you are interested in a specific history subject, try searching our archives, you are bound to find something to pique your interest.

From Our Magazines
Weider History

Weider History Network:  HistoryNet | Armchair General | Achtung Panzer! | StreamHistory.com
Today in History | Ask Mr. History | Picture of the Day | Daily History Quiz | Contact Us

Copyright © 2014 Weider History. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.
Advertise With Us | Subscription Help | Privacy Policy