Wild West – August 2013 – Table of Contents

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Cover Story

The Other James Brother
By Mark Lee Gardner
Forever in Jesse’s long shadow, Frank James may have been the more cunning and cold-blooded of the pair

Whe Bleeding Kansas Became Bloodier
By Frederick J. Chiaventone 
It was 150 years ago during the Civil War that William Clarke Quantrill and his Rebel guerrillas launched their bloody attack on the pro-Union town of Lawrence

Finding South Pass
By Will Bagley 
Robert Stuart and six other Astorians completed the first eastbound crossing of the West since Lewis and Clark and found a practical passage over the Rockies—but South Pass was kept a trade secret

The Battle of Rosebud, A to Z 
By John Flood 
Eight days before the Battle of the Little Bighorn, soldiers faced Plains Indians, including Crazy Horse, in a significant battle that has largely been ignored

Mickey Free: Apache Captive and Free Man 
By Erik Wright
This Mexican boy, captured and raised by Apaches, found his place among his adopted people, first as a warrior, then as an Army scout


Editor’s Letter


Weider Reader
Excerpts from recent articles in other
World History Group titles

Author Mark Lee Gardner’s Top 10 reasons the James brothers were able to elude authorities, a quote about Indians from Theodore Roosevelt, plus news related to the Wild West, including this year’s Spur Award winners.

By Candy Moulton
Author Ann Kirschner looks at the O.K. Corral love triangle, features Josephine Marcus, old love Johnny Behan and new love Wyatt Earp.

Gunfighters and Lawmen
By Terry Halden
John Vipond spent decades prospecting in Montana and New Mexico territories before someone killed him with a pickax handle—but did the right man hang for the crime?

Pioneers and Settlers
By Doug Hocking
Isolated Fort Massachusetts, in the high country of what would become Colorado, was the site of a Fourth of July fandango that drew a who’s who list of guests.

Art of the West
By Johnny D. Boggs
The C.M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Mont., celebrates its namesake, Charles Marion Russell, the "Cowboy Artist."

Indian Life
By Eric Niderost
By leading two prospectors to nearby gold deposits, Tlingit Chief Kowee unwittingly became one of the people who helped found Juneau, Alaska.

Western Enterprise
By Ramon Vasconcellow
Missouri traders, beginning with William Becknell, risked their merchandise and their lives on the trail to make a profit in Santa Fe.

Ghost Towns
By Jim Pettengill
In 1868 a young Calamity Jane is said to have nursed the sick—and whiskey—in the Wyoming gold boomtown of Miner’s Delight.

By Linda Wommack
The Fort Smith Museum of History in Arkansas celebrates the town once known as the last "civilized" place east of the Wild West frontier.

Guns of the West
By Lee A. Silva
Best known for his saddles, craftsman Edward H. Bohlin also helped dress Hollywood Western stars with his fancy gun belts and custom grips.

Johnny D. Boggs looks at classic books and movies about the James boys, plus reviews of recent books about the pair, a book about Wyatt Earp’s wife and a Bat Masterson DVD.

Go West!
Taos Pueblo through the lends of Ansel Adams.


On the Cover: Alexander Franklin "Frank" James, who was born in 1843 and died in 1915, poses here at about age 21. His more famous brother, Jesse Woodson James, was born in 1847 and assassinated on April 3, 1882. (Cover photos: State Historical Society of Missouri [Frank] and Library of Congress [Jesse]; colorization by Slingshot Studio, North Hampton, N.H.)


Cover Story at 25
Wild West has been around for a quarter century. Browse all 150 covers!

Interview With John Koster
The author of the 2010 book Custer Survivor: The End of a Myth, the Beginning of a Legend (History Publishing Co., Palisades, N.Y.) sticks to his Last Stand guns

Misconceptions About Fetterman
In “The Falsehoods of Fetterman’s Fight,” John H. Monnett challenges some of our notions about Captain William Judd Fetterman and the decimation of his command 

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